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CheapStuff.com UDRP Follows $3,875 NameJet Sale

A UDRP was filed against the CheapStuff.com domain name at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). The UDRP is WIPO Case D2020-1354, and it appears to have been filed within the past couple of days.

To me, CheapStuff.com seems like a pretty generic domain name that could be used to sell “cheap stuff.” Likely because of the potential usage for this descriptive domain name, CheapStuff.com sold for $3,875 at NameJet in March of this year, according to NameBio. Based on the “pendingrenewalordeletion@networksolutions.com” email address in the historical Whois record at DomainTools from February 26th, it appears to have been an expiry auction. In fact, CheapStuff.com was promoted by NameJet in its newsletter, even earning the honor of being one of two domain names listed in the email subject:

Be Mindful of Minimum Bid at NameJet

There have been a number of changes at NameJet due to the integration with SnapNames. Most noticeable for me is the backorder deadline time change. I can now place my back orders one hour later than I could before the integration. One issue that has tripped me up more than once is the minimum bid difference on some domain names. Instead of the standard $69 bid, I need to place a $79 bid in order to backorder the domain name.

The $10 difference is not generally a problem, especially considering it is now rare for me to win an auction for the minimum bid. The issue is that when I click the “Place My Bids Now” button, only the $69 backorders are placed unless I manually change the minimum bids for the auctions that require a $79 bid.

Here’s what happens when I do not update the bid to meet the minimum before placing my backorder:

US Government Lets Escorts.com Expire

In March of 2012, I published an article about the government seizure of the Escorts.com domain name. A press release on the FBI website from November of 2011 discloses that the Escorts.com domain name would be seized:

“Pursuant to a plea agreement with the government, National A-1 Advertising and R.S. Duffy pleaded guilty to the money laundering conspiracy charge in the Information, will serve a probation term of 18 months, and pay a $1,500,000 fine. In addition, under the terms of the plea agreement, the defendants agreed to the criminal forfeiture of $4.9 million in cash derived from the unlawful activity, as well as forfeiture of the domain name, Escorts.com, all of which represent property used to facilitate the commission of the offenses.”

NameJet Backorder Closing Time One Hour Later

For many years, I would place my NameJet backorders right before the 11pm Eastern closing time. This was at the end of the evening for me, so the backorder time was pretty convenient as I was often shutting things down for the evening.

At some point in the last couple of weeks, I noticed a change at NameJet. The backorder closing time shifted one hour later – to midnight Eastern time. This gives people an extra hour to place backorders on domain names coming up for auction on NameJet and SnapNames. I believe this change is related to the integration of NameJet and SnapNames that is happening slowly.

NameJet and SnapNames to Fully Integrate

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NameJet and SnapNames are auction platforms that are both owned by Web.com. When it comes to expiry and private auctions, NameJet and SnapNames each operate independently of each other. On deleted domain names, there is an integration, allowing bidders to participate in the same auction on either platform. This is about to change, according to emails sent by NameJet and SnapNames this afternoon.

As of February 11th, bidders can participate in all SnapNames and NameJet auctions on either platform. For instance, BusinessInsights.com is an expired domain name that I can see is coming up for auction on NameJet in 17 days. At present, bidders would only be able to back order and bid on this auction via NameJet. However, after the integration, SnapNames bidders will also be able to participate. This makes sense, and it should drive more revenue for the company if there are bidders who only participate on one platform.

NameJet Holding Focus Groups at NamesCon

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If you’re a NameJet customer attending NamesCon, the company will be hosting focus groups during the conference. Here’s what was emailed to me this morning:

“NameJet will be conducting a series of focus groups at NamesCon 2020 in Austin TX from Jan 29 – Feb 1, 2020. If you are attending NamesCon and would like to participate, please click the link below.

NameJet will be providing a gift to everyone that participates in the focus group.”

There was a sign-up form to choose a time, which you can access via this NameJet tweet:

I am not going to participate in a formal focus group, but I thought I would share some feedback as a NameJet buyer:

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