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Dealing with a Small Pricing Error

I bought a domain name on NameJet in June of last year for less than $100. I priced it at $4,999 on DAN.com, and that is where the domain name resolves. Typically, I price my names a bit higher on Afternic than on DAN because of the higher commission rate and longer payment period, which I discussed at length last September.

Recently, a broker from GoDaddy emailed me because a prospective buyer made a $2,000 offer on this domain name. This would net me $1,600 after the commission, which is a nice ROI but I think it undervalued the domain name. I did a bit of searching, and I noticed that I had underpriced the domain name at GoDaddy / Afternic. This was either accidental or I raised my price at DAN and did not raise it correspondingly at Afternic. Whatever the case, I believe the domain name is more like a $5k domain name than a $3k domain name.

Minimum Offer Doesn’t Carry Over to Afternic Partners

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I have a large percentage of my domain name portfolio listed for sale on Afternic. The vast majority of those domain names are listed for sale with a buy it now price and minimum offer considered. More often than not, buyers tend to purchase my domain names via Afternic at the buy it now price rather than submitting a lower offer, and I like those types of easy deals.

On a handful of higher valued inventory I have listed at Afternic, I do not have a buy it now price set. The domain name market tends to be dynamic, and my pricing can change on those higher valued names on a more regular basis depending on a number of factors. Those names do have a minimum offer price I would consider to open a conversation.

For instance, I have Revitalize.com listed for sale on Afternic without a buy it now price. The domain name has a minimum offer of $145,000. If someone were to do a search to buy Revitalize.com at GoDaddy, they would see it is listed for sale with a minimum offer of $145,000. The purpose is to weed out unqualified buyers, so it does not waste my time or waste the time of GoDaddy’s brokers:

Could a Confusing Credit Card Charge Lead to a $10,000 Sale?

Yesterday afternoon, someone emailed me to ask about a credit card charge that came from a merchant with the 2 keywords that make up one of my .com domain names. He thought my company, vis a vis this domain name, had charged his credit card. I told him that he had the wrong business and thought nothing more of it because this happens on occasion. People usually realize their mistake when I show them that the domain name is not being used as a commercial website and they go off to figure out who charged their credit card.

The domain name that matches the merchant name forwards to a DAN.com landing page, where it is listed with a buy it now price of $8,999. The domain name is also listed for sale on Afternic for just shy of $10,000.

Why I Accepted the Original BIN Price

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I received a $1,300 offer for a domain name via Afternic broker. The name was listed for sale at Afternic with a $1,999 buy it now price. When I had a look at the landing page, I saw that I had repriced it to $3,999 on DAN.com at some point in the past year. I replied to the broker to let him know I would not accept the offer and that the name had been repriced to $3,999 although I neglected to update it at Afternic. The broker came back a few hours later with the buyer’s new offer: $1,999.

Conflicts Between Uniregistry and Afternic

Earlier this month, I wrote about how domain names added to Uniregistry were being listed for sale via Afternic. This served as a bit of a warning to people who may have priced a name for a prospective buyer at Uniregistry and now that price could possibly be listed as a BIN price at Afternic. It could be problematic for someone who doesn’t regularly update prices at Uniregistry.

Although I do not price my names at Uniregistry, I have run into an issue where domain names I own and add to my Uniregistry parking account then conflict when I try to add them to Afternic. I will share an example with you.

Uniregistry Market Names Merged Into Afternic

If you have domain names listed for sale in your Uniregistry Market account, they may have been added to Afternic. This is notable and important to follow because sellers need to ensure their Uniregistry Market names and prices are updated to current market prices and availability.

This morning, I was tracking down a domain name I owned and sold on a payment plan via Escrow.com. When I was checking the Whois record, I noticed the DomainTools message stating, “This domain is listed for sale at one of our partner sites.” I clicked the link and was taken to a for sale page at Afternic indicating the domain name was actively listed for sale on the Afternic platform.

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