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Domain Sales

One Person’s Junk Is Someone Else’s Treasure

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I know nothing about Pierluigi Buccioli beyond the gambling related domain names he shares on Twitter. A tweet he shared yesterday offers two good lessons to highlight for domain investors:

Andrew Rosener Confirms Prodigy.com Sale

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This morning, Jamie Zoch announced that it appeared AT&T sold Prodigy.com, a domain name the company has owned since its involvement with the defunct Prodigy company. Prodigy.com was first created back in 1992, and AT&T offered an email service on the Prodigy.net domain name for quite some time:

“But You Only Paid $500 for It”

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Some domain name buyers are more savvy than others. They actually do some research on the domain name they want to buy beforehand. They may use a source like NameBio or GoDaddy’s appraisal tool to find more information about the domain name and it’s value, and they might come across the sale price of the domain name they are looking to purchase.

I recently sent a handful of emails to prospective buyers to try and sell a domain name I had recently acquired. After a brief exchange, the prospect mentioned my acquisition price. I want to share a paraphrase of how I replied without specifics that might reveal the specific domain name:

Make Offer on Namecheap via DomainAgents

I am interested in buying a domain name registered under Whois privacy proxy at Namecheap. I visited the Whois lookup page on Namecheap to see if I could send a message to the registrant via the Namecheap system (like the GoDaddy Whois contact form), but it doesn’t look like there’s a contact form. Instead, there is a “Make Offer” button above the Whois information:

James Booth Sold Picture.com for $225,000

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Earlier this morning on Twitter, James Booth reported that his company sold Picture.com for $225,000. The buyer is reportedly Brent Oxley, although the Whois registration information is private at Namecheap, and the nameservers are not yet updated:

Listing Domain Names for Sale on Brand Marketplaces

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In the past few years, a number of brand marketplaces have opened to help business operators find brand names. While these platforms are ostensibly selling brand names, in reality, they are also helping domain investors sell their domain names. Three of the most well known (to me) brand marketplaces to sell domain names include SquadHelp, Brand Bucket, and Brandpa.

When someone is looking to start a brand or rebrand their business, there is a good chance they will do various Google searches related to brand name creation. I would imagine there are more people looking at brand-related keywords than domain name search keywords. I would imagine that more business owners are looking to find a perfect brand name and then hope to find the most suitable domain name that matches. SquadHelp founder Darpan Munjal touched on this in a tweet on Sunday:

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One Person’s Junk Is Someone Else’s Treasure

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A couple of weeks ago, I saw that Finwise.com was pending delete and would be auctioned. I liked the name because it was a...