Daily Poll: Will the “Chip” Market Make a Comeback?

5

Giuseppe Graziano published his market report this week, and it wasn’t great news for Chinese Premium “Chip” domain names. Ray Hackney wrote about this yesterday.

I own a couple domain names that would be considered “Chips,” but I also think they are good for Western buyers as well. I don’t closely follow this market, so I wouldn’t speculate about its health or potential for future revitalization. I would be interested in knowing whether readers think the Chip market is primed for a comeback or if it will continue to fall. You are welcome to share additional thoughts in the comment section if you would like:


Report: IRS.com Sold for $600,000

2

In a deal uncovered by George Kirikos and shared on Twitter, the IRS.com domain name was reportedly sold for $600,000:

In the SEC filing noted by George, the company stated the following about IRS.com:

“On June 11, 2018, we sold the IRS.com web domain to a company in which our former CFO has a significant ownership interest. The consideration consisted of a cash payment of approximately $0.6 million and assumed liabilities of approximately $0.1 million. We recognized a gain of approximately $0.6 million on the transaction which is reported in Other gain (loss) on our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss).”

I am not exactly sure what the assumed liabilities of $100,000 are, but if I am reading it correctly, it would seem that the buyer paid $600,000 to buy IRS.com. It is unclear to me if the purchase

Look at the Other Extensions

2

When I receive an offer or inquiry, I tend to do a little research before replying. I want to see who is interested in acquiring my domain name, and I also want to see why they might be interested in buying the domain name.

To do this cursory research, Google, LinkedIn, and even Facebook are the primary tools I use. Typically, I can find out all I need to know within a few minutes of searching.

One of the best tools that can be used though, is one I use every day: Whois searches. Despite GDPR being in effect rendering this tool less useful, it can still be helpful.

A Whois search is helpful because it

Christian.com Sold for $600,000 via Sedo

1

Sedo broker Dave Evanson just announced via Twitter that he brokered the sale of Christian.com for $600,000:

Once the sale is archived on DNJournal by Ron Jackson, it will rank as the fifth largest sale of the year (to date). The sale will rank above the $550,000 sale of Inception.com and below the $750,000 sale of Liquid.com.

According to NameBio, Christian.com last publicly sold in 2009 for

Daily Poll: Is Domain Investing Ethical?

11

I regularly see people discuss whether certain aspects of the domain investment business are ethical. People question the ethical nature of what happens with expiring domain names, auction bidding, trademark registration, pay per click parking, affiliate marketing, and a variety of other issues and topics related to investing in domain names.

Some people outside of the domain investment business don’t think investing in domain names is ethical at all. It’s certainly legal, but some people question the ethical nature of domain name investing. I thought it would be interesting to poll domain investors to ask if their business – the domain investing business – is ethical.

Vote in today’s poll and feel free to expand with a comment:


Yesterday’s poll: Daily Poll: How Often Do You Make Purchase Inquiries and Offers?

Dispute.com Auction Winner Defaults

43

Dispute.com sold at GoDaddy Auctions last week for $65,000. I learned that the winning bidder in this auction defaulted, and this news was confirmed to me by Paul Nicks, GM of the GoDaddy Aftermarket.

The way GoDaddy’s system works on default winning bids is that the next highest bidder would get the opportunity to buy the domain name for the next high bid as if the winning bidder did not participate. If that buyer opts to not purchase the domain name, the opportunity would go to the next high bidder. This continues until a bidder accepts the price and purchases the domain name.

The domain name was sold to the sixth highest bidder in the auction. Although GoDaddy does not disclose sale prices, the company made an exception in this case, and I was told the domain name

Recent Posts

Daily Poll: Will the “Chip” Market Make a Comeback?

Giuseppe Graziano published his market report this week, and it wasn't great news for Chinese Premium "Chip" domain names. Ray Hackney wrote about this...

Report: IRS.com Sold for $600,000

In a deal uncovered by George Kirikos and shared on Twitter, the IRS.com domain name was reportedly sold for $600,000: Remark Holdings $MARK sold the...

Look at the Other Extensions

When I receive an offer or inquiry, I tend to do a little research before replying. I want to see who is interested in...

Christian.com Sold for $600,000 via Sedo

Sedo broker Dave Evanson just announced via Twitter that he brokered the sale of Christian.com for $600,000: Just sold Christian(.)com for $600,000 @sedo!! Congrats to...

Daily Poll: Is Domain Investing Ethical?

I regularly see people discuss whether certain aspects of the domain investment business are ethical. People question the ethical nature of what happens with...