Believe.com Sold for $200,000 via Kate Buckley

15

Domain broker Kate Buckley announced that her company (Buckley Media) successfully brokered the sale of Believe.com for $200,000. Based on the current Whois records, it would appear that the deal has already transacted.

The sale was announced via Kate’s Twitter account earlier this morning:

This is the second six figure sale Kate brokered this month. Less than a week ago, Kate announced the $100,000 sale of GreenStreet.com. That sale is currently tied for the 17th largest publicly reported domain name sale of 2020, as reported by DNJournal. The $200,000 sale of Believe.com will rank as the sixth largest sale of the year (to date) tying the $200,000 sales of Profitable.com, Shop.app, and AOA.com. I also added the sale of Believe.com to the Embrace.com list of one word .com domain name sales.

According to updated Whois records at DomainTools, the buyer of Believe.com appears to be a French company called Believe Digital. The company appears to own BelieveMusic.com and BelieveDigital.com, and it appears to have raised $60 million in funding, according to Crunchbase. By acquiring Believe.com, there will be less confusion about where to find this company, and it can drop the “Digital” and “Music” from its branding if it chooses to do so.

Prior to the sale of the domain name, Believe.com had been owned by Spark Networks USA, the company that operates websites like Christian Mingle, JDate, and Zoosk, among others. Believe.com currently forwards to the Buckley Media landing page advertising the domain name for sale.

Believe.com is a great domain name, and this is a smart (and affordable) buy for Believe Digital. If I learn any more about the sale, I will share an update.

15 COMMENTS

  1. Definitely undervalued at 200K. A good deal for the buyer.

    There are few better positive/aspirational one word dot coms out there than this one.

  2. GreenStreet.com was a “good sale” as they say, and I almost never can honestly agree with that.

    This, Believe.com, was most definitely *not* a good sale, so it’s a bummer to see any BS about that.

      • Okay, I’ll play.

        In the real world of real end users, real commercial potential and real domain “cache,” this is a minimum low 7 figure domain.

        I would not have been quite as “upset” with at least $500k. And at $700k to $900k I probably would not have said anything about being undervalued, depending on what kind of mood I was in.

          • 1) I agree with your evaluation. Strongly.
            2) I still congratulate Kate, especially in this economy.
            3) If you’re going to take shots at people, please don’t hide behind anonymity.

          • 1. Glad to hear. I figured it had to be impossible you didn’t agree with that.

            2. The problem I see with all this happy “colleagiality” and pleasantry is that it goes on no matter what, year after year. Most importantly, it sends a message of approval and support, i.e. for the whole enchilada including the price announcement. This, multiplied a hundred and a thousand times, has ripple effects, both in the industry and world at large. And ultimately, it contributes to and helps bring about sales figures like this, regardless of the economy, with people then just wanting to be collegial and congratulatory all over again the next time. It also encourages those in the industry who are less principled and just want to create and capitalize on “churn” and make a quick buck to fan the flames of such implied approval and support.

            3. I don’t take shots at people. Except when there is clearly a conflict in which the other party is “the bad guy” and has been the unjustified aggressor, or even just a “jackass” or troll. What I do is from good motives. I say what I mean and mean what I say. I take shots at light vs. darkness and truth vs. the opposite. Even when it looks like taking a shot at someone, it is from a place of benevolence. Not only do I want to address concrete or implied “darkness,” but I also want to keep or extricate the person from it themselves. Sometimes I even like the person far too much to just let it go or let them remain in it. There is a place for and a value in anonymity. Just ask Julian Assange and Wikileaks. It is clear when a troll is just a troll, I even call them out myself, vs. anonymous-but-not. A person feels more willing and ready to say things that really should be said and need to be said, but won’t be said or said adequately. There is no need to be concerned about friendships and seeing people at the conferences and so forth. Personally, I only feel the need for maybe a few more years of it give or take. But I’m really not that interesting anyway. It would not make much difference if I wasn’t. All you would find is that maybe a small handful of my domains which are not under privacy are a bit interesting. Well a UK online friend of mine found one and raved about it in astonishment to me recently, but overall not that interesting. Not a known person, not famous, no UDRPs or anything like that. Just a guy. With a passion for truth, truth-in-domaining, and the larger causes of the big picture beyond. And yes it’s possible to sometimes get a bit carried away, and a few times Elliot has even given me a good ass whooping when I might actually even be willing to agree I possibly had. 😉 But I’m all about the benefit of both our cause, and the people involved, even when it might seem a tad strong.

          • If the buyer was actively looking to sell I’d say it is a good sale (maybe 2x wholesale). It is the type of name that could sell for more but it would need a lot of waiting.

  3. Agree with John here. Value of Believe.com is way above $200k. It is a top of the pack dot com…not many better. $200k is definitely not the top of the market. Look at comps like Great.com and Super,com, sold for $1.0-$1.2 mil each. And those were undervalued too.

Leave a Reply