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Top Public Uniregistry Market Domain Sales YTD

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Earlier this morning, I published a press release from Uniregistry with details about its year to date sales results. The company reported that it sold 3,617 domain names totaling more than $29,000,000. I asked Uniregistry VP of Sales Jeff Gabriel if he could share any more details about YTD sales at Uniregistry Market, and he sent me a list of over 2,700 sales worth more than $17.2 million. Jeff mentioned that many of the sales were removed, so the list I received is abridged.

Several of these sales were previously reported. For instance, I wrote about the the sales of Squeeze.com and Coya.com. I presume there are other domain name sales that have been written about by me or by others. I also presume this list of sales will be reported to DNJournal and NameBio for archiving. Once Ron Jackson has this data, there will be some major changes at the top of the DNJournal Year to Date sales report.

For the sake of convenience I am sharing all of the sales I received that are worth $20,000 or more. There are 156 domain name sales worth $20,000+, and the vast majority of those are .com sales. In this list of 156 sales, there are a handful of .net and .org sales, and there are some one-off sales in other extensions such as .ca, .link, .co.uk, .co, and others.

At a quick glance, there are some really, really solid sales here. If I owned some of these names, I almost certainly would have undersold them. There also seem to be a few solid deals for the buyer. Sometimes people are happy to move inventory and the buyer gets a good deal.

Have a look at the list and let me know your thoughts.

2017 YTD Publicly Reported Uniregistry Market Sales

  • kombucha.com $200,000
  • squeeze.com $150,000
  • mng.com $140,000
  • hebe.com $125,000
  • masterplan.com $117,650
  • usedcarsforsale.com $100,000
  • rra.com $100,000
  • andes.com $87,000
  • nextfoods.com $80,000
  • cozmo.com $77,800
  • riseup.org $75,000
  • nant.com $74,000
  • freemen.com $72,000
  • feetfirst.com $70,000
  • odds.net $70,000
  • yoco.com $70,000
  • collegeprep.com $65,000
  • freeamerica.com $65,000
  • wrinkles.com $65,000
  • kandle.com $62,500
  • brandmax.com $62,000
  • juegos.net $60,000
  • ocap.com $60,000
  • villagehotels.com $60,000
  • huny.com $60,000
  • botay.com $60,000
  • consciouslife.com $55,000
  • aifx.com $50,700
  • greatdane.com $50,000
  • sci-fi.com $50,000
  • henge.com $50,000
  • hackme.com $50,000
  • fxgo.com $48,000
  • sexpills.com $46,000
  • doherty.com $45,000
  • machines.com $45,000
  • southpole.com $45,000
  • spearfishing.com $45,000
  • picstart.com $42,000
  • broadcity.com $40,000
  • ladylucks.com $40,000
  • tari.com $40,000
  • juice.net $40,000
  • pressurecookerrecipes.com $39,600
  • lgra.com $38,400
  • wkly.com $38,000
  • bjorn.com $37,500
  • fishinglicense.com $35,300
  • cityoftomorrow.com $35,009
  • bodegas.com $35,000
  • dieta.com $35,000
  • plant.org $35,000
  • schoolhouse.com $35,000
  • singa.com $35,000
  • lidocaine.com $35,000
  • chatlines.com $33,000
  • laceup.com $32,200
  • modernhero.com $31,000
  • duit.com $30,000
  • geofilter.com $30,000
  • mxconnect.com $30,000
  • natalie.com $30,000
  • oboz.com $30,000
  • okamura.com $30,000
  • quantumcomputing.com $30,000
  • shakengo.com $30,000
  • smil.com $30,000
  • socialsites.com $30,000
  • stripe.net $30,000
  • workplacechat.com $30,000
  • defeat.com $30,000
  • pianoonline.com $30,000
  • karv.com $30,000
  • smallbusinessmarketing.com $30,000
  • gemz.com $30,000
  • holidayresorts.com $29,992
  • autoloan.ca $29,000
  • iotu.com $29,000
  • disciple.com $28,500
  • wext.com $28,000
  • floaties.com $28,000
  • towny.com $28,000
  • sportvideo.com $27,963
  • zipi.com $27,500
  • travelvip.com $27,000
  • iluck.com $26,000
  • sportindia.com $25,972
  • apptitude.com $25,000
  • ejaza.com $25,000
  • kidx.com $25,000
  • math.net $25,000
  • mobiliti.com $25,000
  • neveragain.com $25,000
  • opiniones.com $25,000
  • proguard.com $25,000
  • resumetemplate.com $25,000
  • sanad.com $25,000
  • texasdwiattorney.com $25,000
  • topknot.com $25,000
  • urbanlegends.com $25,000
  • wheelz.com $25,000
  • turbot.com $25,000
  • netsolutions.com $25,000
  • livehub.com $25,000
  • sportslab.com $25,000
  • kreditkort.com $25,000
  • shop.link $25,000
  • cardash.com $25,000
  • transpire.com $24,984
  • star.house $24,980
  • vanta.com $24,980
  • aquifer.org $24,000
  • buildwealth.com $24,000
  • dubaiescorts.com $24,000
  • native.co.uk $24,000
  • tow.co $24,000
  • vmaa.com $24,000
  • bitkeys.com $23,936
  • batterypacks.com $23,000
  • kpi.org $23,000
  • luxuryhomerentals.com $23,000
  • phasedarray.com $22,800
  • coya.com $22,500
  • leaseconnect.com $22,000
  • mr8.com $22,000
  • nique.com $22,000
  • worktrip.com $22,000
  • johnnyb.com $22,000
  • veta.com $21,500
  • kissykissy.com $21,000
  • vegasbaby.com $21,000
  • masterplan.com $21,000
  • accountingfirm.com $20,000
  • armr.com $20,000
  • bankholidays.com $20,000
  • bemobi.com $20,000
  • brandsite.com $20,000
  • coinbook.com $20,000
  • discountenergy.com $20,000
  • hinged.com $20,000
  • hubhub.com $20,000
  • leech.com $20,000
  • libertybridge.com $20,000
  • maak.com $20,000
  • mitzy.com $20,000
  • politix.com $20,000
  • rootz.com $20,000
  • stey.com $20,000
  • ts3.com $20,000
  • visawaiver.com $20,000
  • wholesalesneakers.com $20,000
  • guojian.com $20,000
  • entreprises.com $20,000
  • mixboard.com $20,000
  • babyplan.com $20,000
  • electrosource.com $20,000

About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has sold seven figures worth of domain names in the last five years. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest.


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Comments (44)

    SMO

    Great job reaching out and getting valuable sales data Elliot. In order to remain transparent and benefit all your readers, you should publish or make available for download via link all 2,700 sales you received.

    The valuable data is in sales under $20k (Which i’m sure you agree) as this is the sweet spot in the domain aftermarket. Listing/making available only 156 of the 2,700 sales is only 17% of sales data. What I’m interested in and assume many others as well, is the 93% of domain sales Not Published, as these tell the true story of trends, demand, etc.

    Hope you publish as fast as you published the 156 domain sales above $20k.

    Thanks.
    SMO

    September 19th, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    SMO

    Update with correct math percentage. =)

    Great job reaching out and getting valuable sales data Elliot. In order to remain transparent and benefit all your readers, you should publish or make available for download via link all 2,700 sales you received.

    The valuable data is in sales under $20k (Which i’m sure you agree) as this is the sweet spot in the domain aftermarket. Listing/making available only 156 of the 2,700 sales is only .06% of sales data. What I’m interested in and assume many others as well, is the 99.4% of domain sales Not Published, as these tell the true story of trends, demand, etc.

    Hope you publish as fast as you published the 156 domain sales above $20k.

    Thanks.
    SMO

    September 19th, 2017 at 12:32 pm

      Elliot Silver

      I assume they will be reported to NameBio and more easily sortable than if I just pasted the huge list here.

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 12:51 pm

    John

    Look, good news for the world:

    EFF Resigns from World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) over EME Decision – http://www.circleid.com/posts/20170919_eff_resigns_from_world_wide_web_consortium_w3c_over_eme_decision/

    W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret – https://www.networkworld.com/article/3225456/internet/w3c-drm-appeal-fails-votes-kept-secret.html

    September 19th, 2017 at 1:04 pm

      John

      (Naturally, this was just a “side note” folks. Looks pretty important.)

      In reply to John | September 19th, 2017 at 8:54 pm

    Konstantinos Zournas

    Machines.com was a great deal!

    September 19th, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    SMO

    Elliot,

    Your comment is ridiculous at a minimum. So your readers are to conduct their own research, while you hold the sales data they seek? You assume namebio.com will provide the information on their database? Then why make this post at all, as under your assumption these top sales data would be provided in their database just as well.

    Best to not assume as they may not have been given access to this list, just like DnJournal.com has never received this list of sales data to add to their database.

    Further more, as a respected blogger in the domain industry and with a domain name like “DomainInvesting.com” as your blog, you should remain “transparent” at all times, not only when it benefits you. You rather send readers to another website instead of provide the data on hand? Does this make sense? Pretty selfish IMO.

    Lastly, it is not difficult to place a downloadable link of this sales list in the article, preventing you from having to publish full list in blog post. Your readers are not dumb rookies and can see through the fog.

    Your actions or lack of actions on this topic will determine if you are truly a transparent blogger. There is no excuse for you not publishing this list, other than being nontransparent, greedy, and selfish at a minimum. Lazy is not even an option.

    Thanks,
    SMO

    September 19th, 2017 at 1:38 pm

      Elliot Silver

      “Your readers are not dumb rookies and can see through the fog.”

      Smart readers would email Jeff and Frank themselves and ask him for the list instead of relying on a third party to publish it.

      I am not going to publish a massive list of sales no matter how much you try to bully me to publish it.

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 1:44 pm

      John

      Okay now this would seem to be an example of “overdoing it”…

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 3:56 pm

    Dan

    Master plan is on here twice at two different prices.

    September 19th, 2017 at 2:51 pm

      John

      That’s not a typo or mistake; just part of a master plan…

      In reply to Dan | September 19th, 2017 at 3:53 pm

      Elliot Silver

      I presume it sold twice.

      In reply to Dan | September 19th, 2017 at 3:56 pm

      John

      Ah, but one should never presume, because when you presume you only make an…oh, never mind. 😀

      And wow – what a huge price differential on those two appearances.

      In reply to Elliot Silver | September 19th, 2017 at 4:00 pm

    John

    I hadn’t even looked at the list earlier. I’m amazed at how horrible a lot of those domains are relative to the price. Perhaps it’s time to list with them. 😐

    September 19th, 2017 at 3:32 pm

    AN

    usedcarsforsale.com $100,000

    A 4-worder…Nice deal for the seller

    September 19th, 2017 at 4:28 pm

      John

      Ironically, since I still did not closely examine the list, I missed that one. But if you’ve seen my posts in the blogs on the topic over the last year or so, you would know why I say “ironically.” Others are quite familiar with what I’ve written, however. Suffice it to say that relates to one of the biggest problems and mistakes in the entire industry, and here we have a great example of what I have been addressing all this time.

      In reply to AN | September 19th, 2017 at 8:35 pm

    SMO

    @Elliot. Once again, a ridiculous comment and arrogant one at that! No problem. Will email Jeff/Frank for data and publish on namepros.com to share with community if I am able to obtain it. This way Jeff/Frank do not receive hundreds of emails from your readers requesting the same info you refuse to share, in which you have on hand. At least now we know the truth of YOU being NONTRANSPARTENT and selfish.

    True colors shown Sir. I call a spade a spade, when a person is given an opportunity to be transparent and refuses to do so. Saying I will not be pressured to publish the list. I guess it clear you will only publish sales data publicly only when it is of no value to you to benefit from.

    @John, you of all people saying example of “Over Doing It” is definitely calling the kettle black. After all the books you have written in comments among all industry blogs, with many “Well Over Done” Sir. I am not out of line by requesting Elliot to remain transparent by disclosing full list of sales data.

    It is essential to hold bloggers/businesses accountable when they blatantly refuse to remain transparent or for unethical business practices services the domain industry or any other industry one does business in. Both in which can be shown by Elliot cherry picking data to share, then try to turn it on me by saying smart readers would just request info from jeff/frank. So don’t bother him to publish data for his readers.

    September 19th, 2017 at 4:48 pm

      Elliot Silver

      I am not sure why you think I am obligated publish a massive sales report with thousands of sales. This is not NameBio, DNSalePrice, or even DNJournal. As a blogger, I found something of interest in the data I saw and wrote about that.

      You’re throwing a temper tantrum because I am not publishing something you want to see. If you have an issue with transparency, take it up with Uniregistry Market because it is their data and not mine.

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 5:12 pm

      John

      Look SMO – only I get to rebuke and pick on Elliot, such as if he ignores Net Neutrality, the ICANN transition, or perhaps later this new business involving the EFF and W3C. 🙂

      Otherwise, what am I missing here? If Elliot only includes partial data from data that is accessible elsewhere (or is it?), then how does that have anything to do with his own “transparency”? And while I certainly agree that certain types of lack of transparency are undesirable and potentially just plain bad, Elliot is completely upfront about not being 100% transparent about all things, even though he has shared a great deal of greatly valuable stuff with everyone too. For example, he is completely upfront about how and why he does not share his own sales data, and that is his prerogative. What am I missing here about how this particular issue you are addressing is something bad on his part?

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 8:42 pm

      John

      Oh, and look what he did below – posting the link to all the data…

      In reply to John | September 19th, 2017 at 8:43 pm

      Elliot Silver

      I don’t think you are missing anything.

      It was my prerogative to not publish a massive third party domain name sales list. I don’t publish the monthly NameJet sale list or weekly Sedo sale list either.

      In reply to John | September 19th, 2017 at 8:47 pm

      John

      Indeed.

      In reply to Elliot Silver | September 19th, 2017 at 11:44 pm

    Elliot Silver

    September 19th, 2017 at 7:08 pm

      John

      Okay, so if this is what the guy above is talking about, then I’m really feelin’ it here. This is great. I still stand by my reply above. Thanks for posting this…

      In reply to Elliot Silver | September 19th, 2017 at 8:44 pm

    SMO

    Yup, they sure did. And I thanked Michael for doing so.

    For the record, I was not throwing a temper tantrum Elliot. This is something you should have done from the get go as a respected blogger and domain investor, publish all sales data in same fashion when asked kindly. Instead of making senseless comments, and sending readers to namebio.com to research unpublished sales data and advise “smart folks” to contact jeff/frank direct for info instead of rely on 3rd party data, as you so blatantly commented.

    You publish quite a bit of 3rd party content, does this mean it is all untrustworthy?

    Furthermore, what you have proven publicly is that you are a nontransparent blogger with only your best interests in mind. Unethical at a minimum, for a blog that publishes data to educate/assist domain investors.

    Bloggers/businesses will be held accountable when they choose to be nontransparent or conduct unethical business practices by those with the moral fortitude to call out such practices.

    When exposed publicly by choice and even non choice, “A Spade Is A Spade” at the end of the day, no matter how you try to spin it.

    Point made and published on Namepros.com for all to read. You can not silence folks on the internet, in case you have not figured this out yet, Sir.

    https://www.namepros.com/threads/domaininvesting-com-blog-chooses-to-be-non-transparent-namebio-com-ends-up-publishing-sales-data.1041724/

    Thanks.
    SMO

    September 19th, 2017 at 8:32 pm

      Elliot Silver

      As I said from the beginning, NameBio archived the full set of sales. That is what NameBio does and not what I do. I don’t report full sale lists from NameJet or Sedo either.

      Your comment about me keeping the data private is nonsense. It’s not even my data and I have no control over it. I am sure Jeff shared it with others who asked, including NameBio and DNJournal.

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 8:41 pm

      John

      LOL – Looks like I should have scrolled down further before replying above…

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 8:45 pm

      John

      Okay, now the we have all that straightened out, SMO if you want to revisit the topic of “books” I have written in comments you need only scroll up here in this thread: https://domaininvesting.com/uniregistry-market-domain-sales-ytd/?replytocom=881717 🙂

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 8:50 pm

    Noobie Domainer

    @SMO, Elliot is not obligated to publish entire lists of anything. He runs a privately-owned blog and he has the right to publish whatever he wants. Unless you are paying him to blog, he doesn’t owe anybody anything.

    September 19th, 2017 at 8:59 pm

    SMO

    @Noobie Domainer,

    Yup you are right. However, there is something called professional etiquette and ethical business practices. When an industry blog refuses and chooses not to publish valuable sales data to keep for himself and cherry pick’s data to release publicly, trust is lost along the way of content published. This is not my opinion but fact. If an industry blog wants to operate in a nontransparent manner, what true value do they offer readers or their advertisers? If you are going to hoard sales data, do not make it public that you have gained access to it. Simple as that!

    Aplaud/salute Michael from namebio.com making this sales data public approx. 7 hours later after this post. Elliot should have just made full list public instead of hoarding the data. I am not the only one who feels this way.

    September 19th, 2017 at 9:44 pm

      Elliot Silver

      if my intent was to be non-transparent as you claim, I would have deleted your comments and blocked your IP.

      As I said from the jump, the full list is available on NameBio and anyone who didn’t want to wait patiently for them to publish it could have reached out directly to Jeff and Frank like I did rather than bitch about it here.

      i have zero interest in engaging with you any further about this or anything else for that matter.

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 9:57 pm

      John K

      You are a very patient man to put up with such an irritating and self-righteous troll. I would have quit after the first comment.

      In reply to Elliot Silver | September 20th, 2017 at 10:31 am

    SMO

    @John,

    I have read many of your book comments Sir. I am not insulting you in anyway, as lots of opinion and info you comment on thru blogs have value. Many of which I enjoy reading. I was just replying to your comment with “this is an example of Over Doing it”, which I felt was directed at me.

    I apologize if I was wrong and you were talking about the links you posted. I do not apologize if indeed it was directed at me.

    Thanks
    SMO

    September 19th, 2017 at 9:50 pm

      John

      Thanks SMO. 🙂 I was making a vague reference to my defense of a “side note” off topic post (of mine) over at TheDomains shortly before, in which I stated that people know I don’t overdo it, but yes I did think you overdid things with Elliot here. I’m really big on transparency and such too, but I did not see any reason to find fault here about the data. Hopefully this won’t change your good opinion of some of my posts, however. We all get carried away sometimes, even me. 🙂

      In reply to SMO | September 19th, 2017 at 11:51 pm

    Pat w...

    Incredibly Great Work Elliot — Definitely a “10” Star Post !!!

    September 19th, 2017 at 11:43 pm

    John K

    Regarding your comment about that you would have undersold many of these names. Double that for myself if I had owned them.

    Any thoughts about what enables such strong prices? Just having the balls to ask and then waiting however long it takes for the right buyer?

    Random luck driven by huge numbers of listings that you find a few people willing to pay unusually high prices? I didn’t look deeper into the full list to see if these are pricing outliers or if the high prices continue throughout.

    Something about the platform and/or the selling experience that persuades people to pay more than they might if the name were listed elsewhere?

    September 20th, 2017 at 11:02 am

      Elliot Silver

      Much of it probably has to do with being able to afford to say “no” and not regretting a lost opportunity. The buyer has to also need the domain name badly enough to pay for it. For some buyers, the incremental cost will be made up by the business they are going to use on the domain name. They may pay $25k more than they wanted to pay, but they will not have to worry about rebranding or confusing customers.

      When business is great for me, it is much easier to say “no” than when things are slow and I want to move inventory.

      In reply to John K | September 20th, 2017 at 11:09 am

      Anon

      99% of it is this: “Just having the balls to ask and then waiting however long it takes for the right buyer?”

      If you don’t need the cash, why accept a lower price? Just wait for the right buyer to come along who will pay your price.

      If you need the cash, you will accept a lower price. So the question is: How badly do you need the cash?

      In reply to John K | September 20th, 2017 at 11:11 am

    Anon

    I find it ironic that SMO whines and whines about transparency yet does not even use his real name to post.

    September 20th, 2017 at 11:08 am

    Hans

    How many new Gs are in the list?

    September 21st, 2017 at 3:48 am

      Ian Ingram

      128 domains from 68 ngTLDs. Just posted a breakdown of those & other stats on Twitter.

      In reply to Hans | September 25th, 2017 at 7:41 pm

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