2019 .NYC Best of the Boroughs Contest

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The .NYC registry team led by Neustar is hosting its annual Best of the Boroughs contest for .NYC domain name users. The contest aims to highlight and award five websites that use .NYC domain names. One winner from each of New York City’s five boroughs will be selected. The winner from each borough will received a $5,000 cash prize.

Here’s more information about this year’s contest:

“1 Time Each Year. We are celebrating the community of websites that make NYC, on .nyc and we want to feature your business, website or idea in an upcoming citywide advertising campaign. The .nyc domain, on behalf of the City of New York, is looking to showcase authentic .nyc websites as unique as their communities in our inaugural Best of Boroughs contest.

5 Winners

Looking for neighborhood bragging rights? We will have 5 winners across the city – one from each borough. We’re talking to you Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. Winners receive a $5,000 cash prize as well as an upcoming feature in a .nyc citywide ad campaign (plus a few other goodies).

Showcasing .nyc websites as authentic as their community. “

The five winners of last year’s Best of the Boroughs contest were:

  • Manhattan: Play:groundNYC (play-ground.nyc)
  • Brooklyn: Good Call (goodcall.nyc)
  • Queens: City Mission (citymission.nyc)
  • Bronx: Round Seven (blox.nyc)
  • Staten Island: Staten Island Chamber of Commerce Foundation (downtownSI.nyc)

Submissions for this year’s contest are now being accepted. The final day to submit an entry is September 18th. A public voting period will follow the submission deadline, and the winners will be announced on October 23rd.

For more information about the contest and to read its rules and regulations, visit the contest website.

10 COMMENTS

      • I don’t think that has anything to do with Verisign trying to show usage, it was about trying to prove availability of good names because everyone knows that penetration of .com is so high.

        In once sense though both contests are an attempt to disprove something that people know is obviously true. .nyc is largely unknown and good .com domains are not available.

    • “Sure sign that an extension has flopped when the registry runs competitions to try and show usage.” – Snoopy

      @Snoopy – As you know I usually challenge your constant, biased and negative comments across the blogs, but any thoughtful and reasonable person will come to the same conclusion that I have over time.

      That is, you have no interest in the truth, reality and thoughtful discussion. You are intent on being dishonest to maintain your impossible agenda of trying to harm all new gTLDs. You do this not because of some duty to save new domain investors from losing money (that would be noble), instead you do it because you have made poor domain investment choices in the past and you believe if you can somehow publicly control or predict the demise of new Gs you will find redemption, feel better about your choices and potentially feel better if you can just make it to an “I told you so” position (not noble). Your constant bashing, ignoring evidence/logic/signs of success are what lead me to believe this about your motives.

      Here’s what’s more likely… Some new Gs will fail, many will not. Pricing models will change as the market settles. More folks will start using the new domain endings and .com will become less dominant and less relevant. Domain investors may make less while registries attempt to cash in. Uncertainty with .com will force investors who have hundreds or thousands of marginal .coms top drop. This may be exacerbated by rising .com prices and a reduction in the price of premium new Gs. You will not be absolved of your previous poor domain investments (time/money), you will have no impact on end users starting to adopt new domain endings (which will drive investor behavior) and you will continue to be negative and dishonest about your motives.

      As for Neustar and the City of New York running their contest for 3 years with not too much hype, fairly quietly celebrating businesses and orgs who are impacting their local communities while using a .nyc for their site — well that’s just positively fostering a geo namespace by the public-private partnership and it’s THE way to do it. They even have the chamber of commerce from each borough judging this thing.

      Neustar and the DOITT/City of New York are doing a great job.

  1. gotta disagree with you there snoop. some tlds just passively take whatever money they can get, and everyone complains they don’t do marketing and community building..

    then one does and your take is its a sign of weakness.

    we do the same thing for .la, pinterest map shows over 1000 users, helps the community grow

    https://www.pinterest.com/ladomains/la-domain-names-la-websites-and-use-cases/

    good contest .NYC

    Lori, im still ready for the .nyc versus .la challenge

    Page Howe
    iLove.LA

    • I lived in Manhattan for ten years and I never heard anyone refer to it as Manhattan Borough before. I have heard it officially called the Borough of Manhattan but never the other way.

      • My folks / extended family lived, grew up and worked in all 5 boroughs and I, too, don’t recall them referring to Manhattan other than by Manhattan’s districts or as simply “Manhattan”. That said, when the opportunity arose to acquire a few of the 5 boroughs, including the 3 mentioned, I chose to have a bit of fun and own a few. 😉
        Of course, Manhattan Borough President, Gale Brewer – https://www.manhattanbp.nyc.gov/ – might take exception to you or I disregarding Manhattan’s status as a borough or suggesting that her title and status as MBP is merely titular. 😉

        • Ms, Brewer is the “Borough President” whereby Manhattan is the descriptor rather than the title. Her business cards would likely say “Borough President” rather than “Manhattan Borough President.”

          That being said, I think you would likely know the value judging by offers you’ve received.

          Hope you do well with the names though.

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