Daily Poll: How Many Times Do You Follow Up?

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Negotiating to close a domain name sale is one of the more interesting (and perhaps exciting) aspects of domain investing. Engaging an active prospect and trying to work out a mutually agreeable deal never gets old for me.

On the other hand, trying to get a lead to respond can be frustrating. This is especially so when I have been able to identify the lead and think the domain name would be the perfect fit for them or their company. I generally respond to the person via the channel they inquired, but if I don’t receive a response after a couple of attempts, I may try to connect via phone or even LinkedIn.

I am curious how many times others follow up with their inbound inquiry leads before giving up and considering the lead to be dead. You are welcome to share your thoughts in the comment section as well.


8 COMMENTS

  1. We voted never, it is just because we do not sell our names, notice I don’t say never. Everything is for sale.
    We have around 200 .com names they re for our future products though there are more names then we are going to produce.
    We generally get requests to sale a name from Sedo, sometimes the actual buyer, if it is close to what it is worth to us keyword “TO US”.
    If it is like those charity name buyers wanting to pay a few hundred dollars then we never respond.
    We classify those emails as domain name trolls, I mean they might be nice people but we still do not respond.
    Elliot just sharing our experiences about your poll, adding some outsiders understanding.

  2. I am surprised by the votes. I am the only only who voted 5+ so far. Makes sense why people are missing out on sales. I closed over $250,000+ in sales for Frank from leads that were considered dead over a period of two years, some of the leads were from far back as 2009. The best year or vintage as I coined it was 2012. I was the number #1 Broker at Uniregistry for follow up sales and followed closely by Dan Kenney. (Whom is a powerhouse on the phone for number of phone calls he makes a day).

  3. I also voted 5+ times.
    Darryl- Are you still a broker @ Uniregistry? You actually closed and brokered some deals for me a couple years ago. Uniregistry follows UP like crazy…and obviously it works! ๐Ÿ™‚
    So my belief is that You CAN’T blow a deal -EVER- by following up to much or just by saying something(unless you are being unprofessional). I think most deals are lost by the things we DON’T DO/follow up etc.
    If a prospect doesn’t buy from me, they will buy from someone else! It’s my fault and I take full responsibility for that. Many times prospects buy from everyone else but ME and come to me with a broken budget and complain about my price! ๐Ÿ™‚
    Elliot I like one liner follow ups via email like: “Have you given up on this opportunity?” (Give this one a try and let me know how it works for you)

  4. Brokers should follow up and work the low % of success over a long list of leads.

    Owners should never follow up. Never chase.

  5. Most of the time people find me for my .Com domains. I do outbound sometimes, but the majority of my domain sales are inbound.

    I have never depended on domain contact whois, so I try to make it easy for end-users to find me online.
    NameSelling.com website, advertising, Social Media, messenger apps, blogs, forums, search engines, domain aftermarkets, auctions etc.

  6. I follow up a Minimum of 6 times and stop when they tell me to stop contacting them. And then I usually follow up 6 months later, and say I know you weren’t interested 6 months ago, however 6 months is a long time and I’m not sure if things have changed in your business or life but the domain name “Insert domain here” is still available in case you have changed your mind.

  7. It takes an average of 18 calls to actually connect with a buyer (Hubspot). I routinely close six-figure domain sales because I keep circling back with new and relevant information till I get the sale. If your gut tells you it’s the right buyer, be tenacious and keep adding value till they’re ready to come to the table.

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