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GoDaddy

GoDaddy is a privately owned, Internet-based company that provides a variety of services including domain name registration, web hosting and e-business software sales. The company, which is headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona, was founded by Bob Parsons. Parsons previously owned a financial services software company, which he sold in the mid-1990s upon retirement. He came out of retirement in 1997 to form Jomax Technologies, the predecessor to GoDaddy.

Since it’s inception, GoDaddy has risen to become the largest domain registrar in the world, with tens of million of domains registered to its clients. The company ranks as the world’s largest ICANN-accredited registrar; it’s approximately four times larger than its nearest competition. Recent corporate acquisitions include Outright, Locu, Afternic, and Media Temple.

GoDaddy has redefined Internet hosting services, and it has been the recipient of numerous industry awards and accolades. Among these awards are the 2001 Arizona BBB award for Business Ethics and the 2011 SC Magazine award for Best Security Team. In 2011, it ranked number four in the Phoenix Business Magazine list of “Best Places to Work in the Valley” and it made the 2012 Forbes list of “Best 100 Companies to Work For.”

Known for its sometimes controversial commercials and interesting spokespersons, GoDaddy also sponsors a number of charitable causes in support of domestic violence and child abuse awareness, and sports events, including NASCAR and the Super Bowl. In 2013, the company shifted its advertising strategy to focus more on small to medium sized business owners (SMB). Reflecting this change, its commercials and advertising materials shifted from “sexy” to smart.

Paul Nicks Comments on Fiscal Auction

Fiscal.com appeared to be destined for an expiry auction at GoDaddy earlier this week. The domain name auction was due to conclude on Monday afternoon, and bidding had surpassed the $30,000 mark. I was a participant in the auction (bidding over $30,000), and I was prepared to spend considerably more than the high bid. In fact, I had offered more for the domain name earlier this year.

The Fiscal.com auction disappeared from GoDaddy Auctions at some point between Sunday night and Monday. This was surprising because the domain name was registered at GoDaddy and there was less than 24 hours remaining in the auction. As far as I know, a 2017 change in how the expiry process works was supposed to ensure that GoDaddy-registered domain names that make it to 3 days or fewer in an auction with bids can no longer be renewed by the registrant since the redemption period had passed.

“Inconsistencies in the Bidder Assignment Numbers” at GoDaddy Auctions

GoDaddy Auctions is the only domain name auction platform I use on a regular basis that does not show the static bidder nickname for auction participants. In lieu of this, GoDaddy assigns bidders individual Bidder #s in each auction, such as Bidder 1, Bidder 2, Bidder 3…etc. When an auction closes at GoDaddy, bidders can see the static bidder identification numbers of participants.

I have always been under the assumption that the Bidder # is based on the order the person places their bid. For instance, if Bill bids first with a $100 proxy, he would be Bidder 1. If Jane is the second bidder and her bid is $75, she would be outbid by Bill, and she would be Bidder 2. The next person to place a bid would be Bidder 3. If Bill bids again and takes the lead, it would show Bidder 1 as the top bidder. I never put much thought into it, but that is what I have always assumed when looking at the bid order at GoDaddy Auctions.

When I was bidding on the Academic.com auction in July, I noticed something peculiar as the auction was closing. The main auction page had a different leading bidder # than when I opened up the auction bids from the GoDaddy Auctions homepage. It did not really matter all that much to me because I had been outbid, and I have 100% confidence the auction was won fairly.

After the auction concluded, I shared this on Twitter and alerted GoDaddy to what I noticed:

GoDaddy Alerts: New Email from GoDaddy

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Whenever I receive an email from GoDaddy that does not look like a standard GoDaddy email, it gets my guard up. Phishing and spearphishing are big problems, and I regularly see GoDaddy spoof emails. My email hosting provider catches most of them and automatically marks them as spam / junk, so I don’t see many of them in my inbox.

Earlier this week, I received an email from “GoDaddy Alerts” as the sender with an email address of alerts@godaddy.com. The email was a notification that my nameservers had been updated. I had not received an email from the email address or the sender prior to receiving this one.

Make Sure Your Uniregistry Payment Profile is Setup

In March, I published an article with an update email I received from Uniregistry regarding a change to the company’s payments provider. I (wrongly) assumed the update was only necessary for sellers on the Uniregistry Market. In fact, I wrote “I don’t really sell via Uni, so I don’t think I am going to touch anything.”

Over the weekend, I was looking at my Uniregistry parking stats and I realized it had been quite some time since I received a PPC earnings payout. In fact, the end of February was the last time I noted a PayPal payment from Uniregistry for my pay per click advertising revenue.

Joe Styler Launches SicilianSeaSalt.com

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Joe Styler is a Product Manager at GoDaddy, but does much more than that for the company. In many ways, Joe is the face of the company to the domain investment community. Have a question or concern about GoDaddy on NamePros? Joe is usually the guy who answers. He is essentially an ambassador for the company to domain investors.

One thing that I think is neat about GoDaddy is that the company appears to encourage its employees to have side gigs. Joe has embraced this, and he has operated TheaterTickets.com for several years. This afternoon, Joe announced the launch of another side gig on a great domain name – SicilianSeaSalt.com:

How I Ended Up on the GoDaddy India Website

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I’ve heard people complain about visiting GoDaddy and ending up on a foreign version of GoDaddy’s website. The website may be in a local language or show a foreign currency, but it is generally still GoDaddy.com. This has happened to me just a couple of times, but it is disconcerting to visit a website that should be familiar and end up seeing something totally different.

This afternoon, I noticed I was on the GoDaddy India website. I was still logged in to my GoDaddy account, but the logo said GoDaddy India, and the messaging was a bit different than normal. Here’s a look when I navigated to the homepage:

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