Largest New gTLD Sale Reported: Casino.Online Sold for $200k+

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According to a tweet from NameBio, the Casino.Online (new gTLD) domain name sold for $201,250 via Sedo. The sale and its price were confirmed via the Sedo domain sale RSS feed. I don’t believe Sedo offers payment plans or alternative payment options, so this would likely be an all-cash deal.

According to NameBio, this sale is the largest public sale of a new gTLD domain name. Previously, the sale of 1.XYZ for $181,720 in April of 2016 was the leading new gTLD domain name sale. 9.XYZ, which sold for $175,166 and Sex.Live, which sold for $160,000 rounded out the top 3. This is also the largest .Online sale by quite a bit. The second largest  sale is sportwetten.online, a domain name that sold for $16,318 in October of 2016.  There are only 28 .Online domain name sales archived in NameBio at this time.

I did a Whois search for the Casino.Online domain name, and the current registrant is private. A historical Whois search on DomainTools from just a few days ago shows the former registrant of Casino.Online was DotOnline Inc. The email address associated with that registrant is @radixregistry.com, so I am pretty sure that means the sale was completed by the registry rather than a private seller. Radix operates the .Online registry.

The Casino.Online domain name does not yet resolve to a working website, so it is unclear who bought the domain name and how the domain name will be used.

Because of the size of the sale, perhaps Sedo will share more information about it in a subsequent press release. I will email my contacts at Sedo to see if they are able to offer any details about the sale beyond what the company already publicly shared via its public sales feed.

Sedo RSS feed

15 COMMENTS

  1. There’s gonna be lots of shady deals where you don’t know if these are cash deals or other type of backroom dealings. If it quakes like a duck it probably is.

    • Autism.Rocks was too. Backroom dealings can exchange real money that is paid back via other means. Not to say this is what happening but I can’t stop thinking, how do you drive that sort of price? There’s no second bidder at that price so why the first bidder pays that amount? I’m going to remain skeptical of these sort of registry deals.

    • That does not prevent questionable deals from happening. One might lose the transaction fees but that is a marketing/PR expense that can easily be worth many times more.

  2. Look folks, there’s nothing to get all bent about here, and there’s not reason to doubt it is a real deal even if it weren’t a real deal.

    Here’s why:

    1. Contrary to what some might want to convey, it doesn’t do or say anything for the new gTLDs phenomenon. Why is that?

    2. Because a domain like “Casino.Online” is merely one of the most obvious no-brainer examples of “keyword + TLD” combinations that is clearly worth a fortune even if a whole extension is considered worthless or undesirable. In this case I would suggest “.online” is certainly a decent extension overall, albeit very long and very “banal.” I don’t have any and have no plans to. If I could have had this one, however, I certainly would have.

    • Sex.xxx for $3 million and $400k for teen.xxx come to mind.

      I am assuming that these went for real money not involving some funny deals.

      Would not be the first time this happened.

      Very fortunate timing.

      With renewals approaching, a lot of noobs who loaded up on worthless domains might renew them or even load up on more domains.

      The house needs to keep the excitement going.

    • It’s like I’ve said before about Travel.com vs. Travels.com. Travel.com is clearly 8 figure minimum, easily even 9 in a long term deal as I suggested for Golf.com. Travels.com is not as great as the singular but is easily still worth 7 figures.

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