Attend the Heritage Auctions Domain Auction in NYC

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If you’re going to be in New York City on the evening of Thursday, November 21 and you want to see the first live domain auction put on by Heritage Auctions, you are invited to attend the live auction in person. Heritage Auctions is located in midtown Manhattan at 455 Park Avenue.

As with other live auctions, you can bid on the auction floor if you are in attendance. Registration is available in person the day of the event. The auction will feature  live bidding, phone bidding and live Internet bidding, which I suspect will be the most popular form of bidding.

The auction is set to begin at 7pm, and there will be light snacks and drinks beforehand. There is no dress code or suggested attire to attend the live auction. You’ll have the chance to meet Aron Meystedt, who is a domain investor and the Founder and Director of the Intellectual Property Division at Heritage Auctions.

12 COMMENTS

  1. sp quick note for all on the bidding, i think ive figured it out after talking to aron…………… the site takes internet pre-bidding up until he night before, then it says the internet bidding will end, which is true but proxy bids entered in the prebidding system will stay live until topped. so you can bid it and forget it, if your high your proxy carries over through the live auction.

    but even though it says internet bidding ends the night before, the “internet” bidding that continues is the live auction interface where your not entering your bid online, the auctioneer is running the auction, and when looking for the next increment, hitting the virtual bid paddle register your bid…. hopefully this hasnt made it even more confusing……….

    • >>” the “internet” bidding that continues is the live auction interface where your not entering your bid online, the auctioneer is running the auction, and when looking for the next increment, hitting the virtual bid paddle register your bid…. hopefully this hasnt made it even more confusing”

      I’m afraid so, Page, no idea what you just said here.

  2. I have no idea how HA works, but is it safe to assume bidders are somehow prequalified or at least verified to some degree in order to prevent fraud, especially via Internet or over the phone? For instance, at one time the reportedly genuine bidding for a particular .com was at $6.7million on eBay, but then a fraudster came in with a fraudulent $10million bid, killed the auction, vanished without a trace, and the rest is history.

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