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Verizon on Domain Investing: “It’s Not Too Late”

When I think about companies that might advocate for domain name investing, Verizon is not one of the first few dozen that would pop into my head. In fact, Verizon has been fairly aggressive towards cybersquatters over the years. Obviously domain investing and cybersquatting are not one and the same, but I do think there is a fair amount of overlap, particularly with newer domain investors who don’t really know the laws about cybersquatting.

This morning, I was doing a bit of research on Google related to domain investing and the companies who are advertising, and I came across an article on Verizon’s website about domain investing: It’s Not Too Late To Start Domain Investing. To say that I was surprised there is an article about domain investing on Verizon’s website would be an understatement.

BYFY.com UDRP Results in RDNH

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In my opinion, it should almost automatically be considered Reverse Domain Name Hijacking (RDNH) if a complainant files a UDRP when the domain name has been owned by the registrant prior to the existence of the complainant’s brand. Because a complainant absolutely must prove the domain name was registered in bad faith, it would be impossible for this to have happened if the registrant owned the domain name before the complainant’s brand or trademark was created.

A company called Etrack LLC filed a UDRP against the BYFY.com domain name. According to the Factual Background section of the just-published WIPO UDRP decision, “Complainant owns a federal trademark registration for BYFY, namely, United States Registration No. 6,398,262, registered on June 22, 2021 (application filed on July 22, 2020) for…” On the other side of this complaint, “Respondent annexed to the Response a sworn affidavit in which Respondent states he registered the Disputed Domain Name in 2013 or 2014.”

These Domain Names Are Not for Sale!

I have come across quite a few domain names that are not for sale. Sometimes this means the right offer hasn’t been made, but it can also mean that the domain name is actually not for sale regardless of how much money is offered. Perhaps the domain name is being used for something but prospective buyers simply think that is just a stumbling block. Maybe the owner doesn’t need money. There are many reasons for why someone won’t sell a domain name.

Many longtime domain registrants have been so inundated with unsolicited inquiries and offers, so they put a “not for sale” type of message on their landing page. It’s probably not a complete deterrent, but I am sure it does a good enough job of keeping some people away.

I went through some of the landing pages for exceptional domain names that aren’t for sale, and here are some of the best domain names that you can’t buy:

Dynadot Website Down Due to DDOS Attack

If you had trouble accessing the Dynadot website this morning, it is because the company is currently under a DDOS attack. The company posted a notice about the DDOS attack several hours ago on Twitter. Dynadot’s engineering team is working on a solution:

Pending Sales (Imported) on Dan.com Not Listed on Sale Page

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Last Summer, a prospective buyer made an offer on one of my domain names that was too low for me to accept. I had sold a similar name for substantially more, and I told her my expected price range. Out of the blue in late December, she upped her offer substantially to a number that was in-range. I counter offered about 20% higher and did not hear back. After doing some research specific to the domain name and similar names, I came to the conclusion that her offer was very fair, and I sent her a purchase link via Dan.com.

When I didn’t hear back from this prospective buyer after a few weeks, I figured she had either chosen something else or opted to not reply as a negotiating tactic. Perhaps she thought that I might have even more flexibility if she came back in the future. She may have assumed that if I was willing to lower my price to her offer, perhaps I would be willing to reduce it further to salvage the deal. Another thought was that her offer wasn’t backed by any funding so she couldn’t buy it. Whatever the case, I let the deal die on the vine.

Andrew Rosener on Rally’s Addition of Domain Names

In May of last year, I wrote about the possibility of fractional domain name ownership coming to Rally, a venture backed platform that allows users to purchase shares in various types of collectible assets. Yesterday on Domain Name Wire, Andrew Allemann reported that Rally has added domain names as an asset class to its platform. Fractional ownership shares of Directions.com will be for sale within the next couple of hours and other domain names appear destined to follow.

From what I understand, Andrew Rosener of Media Options has played a pivotal role in getting domain names added to Rally. This morning in a series of tweets, Rosener commented about why he became involved in the project and the value he expects it to bring to the domain name aftermarket:

Recent Posts

Verizon on Domain Investing: “It’s Not Too Late”

1
When I think about companies that might advocate for domain name investing, Verizon is not one of the first few dozen that would pop...

BYFY.com UDRP Results in RDNH

0
In my opinion, it should almost automatically be considered Reverse Domain Name Hijacking (RDNH) if a complainant files a UDRP when the domain name...

These Domain Names Are Not for Sale!

4
I have come across quite a few domain names that are not for sale. Sometimes this means the right offer hasn't been made, but...

Dynadot Website Down Due to DDOS Attack

3
If you had trouble accessing the Dynadot website this morning, it is because the company is currently under a DDOS attack. The company posted...

Pending Sales (Imported) on Dan.com Not Listed on Sale Page

1
Last Summer, a prospective buyer made an offer on one of my domain names that was too low for me to accept. I had...