Schedule Emails with Gmail

4

Domain investing is.a 24/7/365 activity for many people. This business gives investors the ability to work whenever and wherever, and sometimes inspiration strikes at odd hours. For me, I might be watching a movie with my wife when I think of a great domain name to buy, and I hit pause to send a purchase inquiry. Sending a domain name related email at 9pm on a Sunday may not be effective, so I like to use the Gmail schedule send functionality.

The primary email address I use to inquire about domain names and to sell domain names is operated by Gmail using one of my own domain names. I have all the functionality of a standard (and free) Gmail account, but it is connected to my domain name. I think the Schedule send functionality is the tool I use most at Gmail.

I typically only want to send emails to buyers or sellers during standard business hours. These vary depending on the location of the recipient. Ideally, my email will be received some time during the business day. I don’t typically want to send the CMO or President of a company an email at 8pm on a Sunday or even 3am on a Tuesday. I want my email to be received in an uncluttered inbox, and there is a greater chance it will be ignored if the recipient gets to it while going through hundreds of other emails on a Monday morning.

Scheduling emails to be sent has been quite helpful to me, particularly this past Spring. When our state first went into a quarantine lockdown from April to June and my kids were home from daycare and school without a babysitter, I was working weird hours. Instead of sending purchase inquiries and responding to emails at 2pm on a Wednesday, I was getting to them at 9pm or later. Being able to schedule emails was probably helpful to me.

Scheduling an email with Gmail is pretty simple. From within the Gmail account, you click the down arrow next to the “Send” button. A “Schedule send” button will appear, and clicking that will give the scheduling options. You can choose one of the default options or choose your own time to send the email.

Whenever inspiration strikes, you can create an email to send and schedule it for a more optimal time.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Scheduling emails is a good idea, and for many businesses, not only for domaining.

    However, why single out one supplier? Especially why that one? Google is responsible for allowing much of the world’s spam generation through its systems whilst it all too often refuses to deliver properly constructed, standards-compliant mail from small businesses and individuals.

    That is quite apart from its belief that it “owns” our private, confidential, information. As a Brit I defend in its entirety my right to privacy and I respect others’ rights to theirs. Google does not. Full stop.

    There are many email systems which offer scheduling. No need to advocate the biggest, and in my view the worst, for the job. Indeed, why single out any one above the rest? Your blog has great merit and would have even more had it not fallen into the “easiest route”, lackadaisical, trap.

    • “why single out one supplier?”

      I write about what I know and use. I exclusively use Gmail across my email accounts these days. I assume other email providers have similar functionality, but I don’t know for sure.

Leave a Reply