DomainTools

My Favorite Domain Graphic

not-resolvingI don’t hand register many domain names anymore. I tend to focus my time on finding great domain names that are coming up for auction and making inquiries on domain names that are privately owned.

When I am looking to buy domain names in a certain niche, I like to use DomainTools to do my Whois searches. It’s easy to see who owns a domain name, and the history tool allows me to see the provenance of the domain name. It’s especially valuable when a domain name is privately owned, and I can see an email address that was previously used.

On occasion, I will find an unregistered domain name that I expected to see registered. This is a score for me because if I was looking it up to buy privately, I would certainly value it at more than the registration fee. When a domain name is unregistered, this is the image that is shown on DomainTools. I love seeing this graphic because it usually means I can hand register a domain name I may have bought privately.

Seeing this graphic doesn’t always mean the domain name is available to register, but I’ve found that more often than not, it indicates an unregistered domain name. I love seeing this graphic, and I think it is probably my favorite domain graphic!

DomainTools Reminder: Change Your Passwords

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DomainTools sent a reminder to its customers today urging them to change their user password because of the Heartbleed bug that has the potential to impact a huge amount of websites. Here’s part of the message I received from DomainTools this afternoon:

“On Monday April 7th, news broke on the Heartbleed bug vulnerability in the OpenSSL cryptographic library and the risk to users’ accounts. This has widespread implications as OpenSSL is used by roughly two-thirds of all websites on the Internet and this vulnerability could expose a user’s login and password to hackers.

As soon as we learned of Heartbleed on Monday we started taking steps to remove the vulnerability. These steps started Monday night and have been completed. Now that new SSL certificates are installed on all of our services, all DomainTools users will be logged out and forced to change their passwords to ensure there is no lingering exposure to Heartbleed. This needs to be done to ensure the security of our users’ accounts and login credentials.”

Although DomainTools is

Monitor Domain Names You Sell

A friend told me a story about a domain name he sold for quite a bit of money that was later dropped by the buyer. It doesn’t make sense that someone would pay for a domain name in the aftermarket only to let it expire, but it happens, and that’s why you should monitor domain names you sell.

There are many reasons why a domain name might drop after someone pays for it. Perhaps they decided they didn’t want to move forward with their project or the person leading the project no longer works for the company. There are a multitude of reasons for why it could have expired.

I can give you three reasons for why you may want to monitor your domain name sales:

DomainTools Running Product Survey with Prize Drawings

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I like giving feedback to companies with whom I do business because I think the information I share can help enhance products and services. DomainTools is seeking feedback from members about its offerings, and they’re asking members to take a 10 minute product survey.

Here’s a message I received from the company yesterday afternoon, with a special offer for members who take the time to complete the survey:

“As a part of our ongoing efforts to improve our

DomainTools Launches Revamped Website

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DomainToolsLogo2013If you’ve done a Whois search this afternoon using DomainTools, it’s likely you noticed that the DomainTools website underwent a major redesign. Along with the redesigned website, the company also revealed a new, black and white logo.

The tagline in the main image states “every online investigation starts with DomainTools,” and  I believe the tagline gives away who the company is targeting with this redesign. Domain investors use DomainTools religiously. Most people who are professionals probably couldn’t function as well (or as comfortably) without using DomainTools. The number of

Be Cautious When Using Domain Search Tool

In March, I wrote an article about how the Domain Search Tool can help you find a buyer for a domain name, and Andrew Allemann recently posted a great video illustrating how to use the tool. In short, this DomainTools tool can help you find other domain names that use your keyword string in them, and it is an exceptional tool to help you find someone to buy a domain name.

I want to give you a bit of a warning if you are using this tool though, based on something that happened to a friend of mine a week ago. It’s not the fault of the tool, but it’s more of a business risk.

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