“MUST READ STORY!!” Adapted for the Domain Name Business

5

A read a tale entitled “MUST READ STORY!!” on LinkedIn this afternoon. It was posted by someone named Daniel Ally, and one of my connections responded to it so it showed up on my newsfeed. I am not sure if this was a rift on another story or if this was original to the LinkedIn post, but I want to share a version I modified specifically for the domain name business. For full context, please read the story on LinkedIn first:

My adaptation of the MUST READ STORY:

A father said to his son before he died: “This is a domain name I registered many years ago. It is more than 25 years old. But before I give it to you, I want you to do me a favor. Go to the NamePros appraisal forum and find out how much it is worth.”

After the son visited the appraisal section of NamePros, he came back to his father and said, “The NamePros users think it is worth $50,000 because it is a valuable one word .com domain name.

The father replied back to him: “Go to Andrew Rosener and ask him what he would be willing to pay for the domain name.” He went and then came back: “Father – Andrew offered $75,000.”

The father thought about it for a minute…

Go to the GoDaddy Appraisal tool and look up the value.”

The son went and came back: “Father—GoDaddy says the domain name is worth $1,756!

The father said: “I wanted you to know that everyone values everything differently. Don’t put yourself in the wrong place and expect to be valued by others. Those who know your true value will appreciate you and pay you exactly what you’re worth!

5 COMMENTS

  1. My adaptation of the MUST READ STORY:

    The NamePros users think it is worth $0.99

    Go to Andrew Rosener , he will offer $1.99

    Go to Godaddy, it is worth $9.99 for renewal fees.

    Go to “BullS, it is worth…million dollars!

    Different people have different tastes.

  2. I think a more appropriate comparison for the domain business would be: jeweler is Rosener, coffee shop people are Namepros and the museum is the right end-user.
    Nice story, I appreciate its inner meaning, agree with it. (in the domain business, it can also mean “don’t be fooled by some self-called “experts” who has their own conflicts of interests, but look after the right end user who knows your name real value and potential …).
    🙂

Leave a Reply