Infographic: Sedo 2013 Domain Market Study

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Sedo shared an illustrative infographic with the details from its 2013 Domain Market Study. For your convenience, I have shared the infographic with you below, but you can visit Sedo’s website to see the infographic in its original (larger) size.

While the report is limited to sales and date from Sedo’s marketplace, I think it is a good barometer for the domain industry in general because of Sedo’s reach and the amount of business the company does annually.

Here is some data from the study, highlighted by Sedo:

  • Sedo had 37,241 transactions in its domain marketplace (up 3% from 2012)
  • Mean average price of $1,893 across all sales (increase from $1,885)
  • 53% of all sales were .com domain names (increase of 5% year over year)
  • Buy it Now sales accounted for 44 percent of all sales in 2013 (up from 41 percent in 2012)
  • 47 percent of all sales for the year were valued at $500 or less
  • .net saw a decrease in mean price to $1,384 (down from $1,880 in 2012) and .org saw an increase in mean price to $1,357 (up from $1,315 in 2012)

2013 Market Study infographic:

Sedo Infographic Small

8 COMMENTS

  1. I wrote this on Andrew’s blog already but will post it here also.

    “87% of sales for $2,500 or less”

    Probably the most important stat on this infographic. $0-$2500 equal 87% but $2500-5000 only at 7%. That’s a huge difference. So basically it’s saying price the majority of your names at under $2500 or it’s going to take a long long time to sell them if ever. Unless you have lots of premium names than your names fall into the next category which isn’t so great when you see that only around 1,000 names sell every year above $10,000. 1,000 names is a drop in the bucket compared to the amount of premium names for sale. The new G’s are going to cut into this even more. That’s incredible.

  2. @Mike, I think there is some real truth to what you say but it is a bit misleading because of the large amount of international buyers which quite often buy domains at lower price levels.

    I think Sedo works well for some people, others it does not. It depends on your portfolio type and those that seek out your domains for purchase, how liquid you want to stay, etc…

    • @Thuggy :: What does it mean “international buyer”? Do you mean “non-US buyer”? We Americans, right? Well, anyway… Keep in mind that the most US companies are public trading companies, having stockholders all around the world. Also keep in mind that Chinese are big buyers in domain market. So using word “international” is misleading 🙂

  3. @ThuggyBiggers, remember GreatDomains in 2007..? If you do, then you know what I am talking about. Like Blackberry in 2000 versus today. Almost like that 🙂 It is coming…

  4. @M.G. …you are absolutely right : Non-U.S. buyers.

    Apologies, normally I would have phrased that differently. I tapped my fingers out and hit enter without qualifying my statement.

    My statement sounded arrogant at first glance. 🙂
    .

  5. Mike,I myself,have had many times cursed SEDO,but,with respect,their top domains,are really TOP domains,I know you probably didn’t intentionally mean ALL their domains are junk,but it came across that way.I suppose when they have millons of domains for sale it appears that the majority are junk,and rightly so…just saying,to keep it fair.Horizon

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