One Person’s Junk Is Someone Else’s Treasure

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I know nothing about Pierluigi Buccioli beyond the gambling related domain names he shares on Twitter. A tweet he shared yesterday offers two good lessons to highlight for domain investors:

Apparently, someone called his domain names “junk,” and three years later, he has reported sold 250 of those domain names for seven figures. From what I can tell, these deals were not done in one large transaction. Pierluigi has been consistently reporting individual domain name sales for some time.

I have never really gotten into gambling-related domain names. In fact, I have never really focused on a specific theme in my domain portfolio. Perhaps it is because I am not really an expert in a specific field to be able to build a portfolio made up of valuable domain names in that field. It seems pretty clear that Pierluigi has built a strong portfolio of gambling domain names, and his sales speak for themselves. He continues to sell these domain names for solid figures.

Becoming an expert on a specific topic and using the knowledge to acquire a portfolio of in-demand, valuable domain names is a great way to build a business. Knowing what domain names will be desired by end user buyers is a great attribute, and it can be profitable.

Commenting on someone’s portfolio, without industry specific knowledge, is a no-no for me. Pierluigi’s domain names may not look valuable to me, but who cares what I think when I am not the target audience. The end user buyers who continually ring Pierluigi’s register are the only critics that matter. They have spoken, apparently to the tune of seven figures, and that is what is important.

13 COMMENTS

  1. Full agreement from this quarter about playing to one’s strengths. I keep looking inside myself for that thread of expertise. The space is cavernous and, sadly, empty.

  2. Good gambling domains are extremely valuable, including long ones of 3 words that are top authority phrases. Some top authority phrases on rare occasions are even 4 words in that industry (note the word “rare”), and I even once had a company listed on the London Stock Exchange trying to buy one of my longest 4 worders, out of the blue when I wasn’t even trying to sell it and was just using it. And in case Snoopy sees this comment and tries to do his usual thing, at this point I probably only have 2 or 3 of those 4 word kind left at most. Probably just 2.

    This year I have sold two of those top SEVERAL WORD authority phrase gambling related .com’s for a very nice multiple-times-$10,000 five figures each in private sales. I have also left myself still holding some of the best. Originally, I was using some of them as an end user, then I went on hiatus awaiting “legalization” here in the US. Now I’m just on indefinite hiatus from actually using them as I focus on other interests and projects in different industries, but I still have some of those extremely valuable gambling industry assets if I decided to jump back in. With the 2 I’ve sold this year, it was just contact out of the blue by an end user with an end user company who really wanted one of them before I showed him an even better one.

    And the real irony is that I’m the guy who is a former fed too, though it was a chapter and not a long part of my life. 🙂 That’s right, folks: not only can gambling be done right and well, but contrary to many people’s mistaken beliefs and ideas it is also not even intrinsically evil, sin, or even a “vice” as some like to say, although it is certainly not any kind of great and noble pursuit or thing to aspire to either. Along with SO MANY OTHER normal interests people have and spend time and money on that they would never even dream of labeling that way, even people in “the church.” I’ve got news for you even: in some cases it can even have some benefits when applying the mind is involved, no doubt literally to the brain itself – most especially poker, which is very much a game of skill and “applied mentality.” Take special note of the word “intrinsically” there. And don’t even get me started on the pseudo-medicalization, psychobabble, and intellectually and politically correct nonsense about “addiction” in an otherwise healthy person either. 🙂

    • PS – I do have some really great and exceptional 2 word .com’s for that industry too, and (wait for it) even sold a good .US domain for that industry for 5 figures not many years ago. Pretty sure it was probably bought by a huge famous industry player, which has been keeping it on ice so far ever since and taking advantage of the de facto .US privacy they get by using one of those registrars that handle “corporate domains” for big companies.

  3. RIP to
    Tony Hsieh, former CEO of Zappos who sold online shoe retailer to Amazon for $1.2B, dies at 46…

    “Before launching Zappos, Hsieh co-founded and sold an advertising startup called LinkExchange to Microsoft for $265 million.”

    LinkExchange dot com….does not worth that much as a domain name—-it is how you built it!!

    • You are talking two different topics though, apples and oranges. There’s a complete difference between a domain not really being worth much vs. people, including (and especially) “professional domainers,” being relatively clueless about how much certain domains are really worth and looking at them only through the myopic lens of “domainer think.” In the case of gambling related domains, it is the latter that applies.

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