Rick Schwartz

Did Mike Mann Dethrone the “Domain King?”

12

Mike Mann is not one to shy away from controversy, and his Facebook post this morning shows this:

Mike seems to be implying that he is the “Domain King” rather than Rick Schwartz (who owns the Domain King trademark and has been referred to as the “Domain King” for a long time). I think Mike and Rick go back many years, so it will be interesting to see how this discussion goes.

At the end of the day, I don’t really think it is important who is called the “King” of the industry. The bottom line is the bottom line, and nicknames don’t really matter. Rick and Mike are both successful, and I think they both get the respect they deserve based on how the industry views their achievements.

Domain Names or Bitcoin?

25

Yesterday, there was a lively discussion about a tweet Rick Schwartz wrote regarding an an upcoming collapse he predicted. Quite a bit of the discussion centered on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency, a topic I am admittedly neither an export nor someone who has much insight about.

This morning, Rick Schwartz wrote a brief series of tweets about domain names and cryptocurrency. The tweets culminated with a final piece of advice about buying domain names instead of Bitcoin:

I know there are many people in the domain name space who also buy cryptocurrencies. Some people are long on these currencies, and others trade them because

“There’s a COLLAPSE coming”

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Rick Schwartz has been tweeting regularly for a few months, often taking aim at the new gTLD program. This morning, he posted what some might say is a provocative tweet declaring “There’s a COLLAPSE coming the likes of which wet eared domainers have never seen b4“. Here’s the tweet Rick posted:

Based on the #gtld hashtag, I presume Rick is predicting there will be a collapse in the number of new gTLD domain names registered. According to nTLDStats.com, there are just under 27 million new gTLD domain names registered, down from a peak of just below 29.5 million.

The “Domain King” has not been shy about sharing his opinions, and

Rick Schwartz to Drop All “Premium .Whatevers in 2017”

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I don’t think it is a secret that Rick “Domain King” Schwartz doesn’t really like the new gTLD program, nor is it a secret that he owns some new gTLD domain names. This morning on Twitter, Rick announced that he intends to drop his premium new gTLD domain names (or at least that is how I interpreted the tweet below). I presume Rick is referring to the new gTLD domain names that do not have a standard renewal fee.

I don’t know Rick’s plans for his non-premium new gTLD domain names that have a standard renewal fee. I also don’t know how many of these “premium” domain names he currently owns. It would be interesting to know how many of these names Rick owns. Based on the tweet, it looks like Rick spent around half a million dollars to buy and renew these domain names. It will be also interesting to follow these drops to see if any of the registries opt to make these drops non-premium for future buyers and/or if others pick up his drops.

I have been contemplating what to do with two of my premium renewal new gTLD domain names – n.Holdings and n.Ventures. If anyone wants to purchase them, I would be happy to work out a fair price and I will donate all proceeds to my Pan-Mass Challenge ride.

It’s Million Dollar Wednesday!

1

I find it a bit amusing observing the domain names people share in response to domain names wanted requests. This goes for forum posts, blog posts, and Twitter posts. It’s particularly amusing to see domain names I wouldn’t hand register being priced beyond retail prices when the prospective buyer is a domain name investor.

As you may have seen, Rick Schwartz has been seeking out domain names to buy via Twitter. From what I have seen, he has purchased one domain name so far.

Rick has declared that today is “Million Dollar Wednesday,” and he is looking to buy  category killer domain names for up to $1 million each:

Sell a Domain Name to the Domain King

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It looks like “Domain King” Rick Schwartz has invited people to submit domain names for his purchase consideration via Twitter. If you have a good, non-new gTLD domain name for sale for $5,000 or below, Rick will give it consideration.

I presume all submissions should be made via Twitter, and if you submit a domain name to Rick for consideration, he asked for the right of first refusal for four hours.

One thing to keep in mind is that the domain name should be worth much more than $5k (at least from Rick’s perspective). He later added that he buys domain names that he believes has at least 10x upside. Put simply, a domain name that Rick will buy for $5k should be able to be sold at some point in the future for at least $50k.

Rick did not say whether he will definitely buy a domain name or not, but this is a good way for him (and others) to see what’s on the market in that price range. My guess is he will be inundated with bad domain names, but maybe he will find something good.

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