Jen Sale on How to Sell Domain Names Wholesale

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Domain investors who want liquidity may opt to try and sell domain names at wholesale pricing. Reducing the price of a good domain name below its retail market value should help induce a sale more quickly. Jen Sale, who is a top industry domain name broker at Evergreen.com, shared some tips for selling domain names at wholesale prices.

I would also offer an additional piece of advice for people looking for liquidity from domain name sales. Do a Google search for terms related to a particular domain name and do some outreach to the most likely prospects based on similar domain names and advertisements. Well targeted emails offering good domain names at reasonable prices will yield good results.

The caveat with outbound marketing is that some types of domain names that infringe on trademarks, it could pose some legal issues.

About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has closed eight figures in deals. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest. Reach out to Elliot: Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

11 COMMENTS

  1. There’s another road block for selling domain names: sending too many or too frequent “well-targeted” but similar email messages will trigger the email providers’ spam filters.

  2. Good tips ,that why my hand reg domains are selling
    Another tips, Patience and have fun
    The attitude of who cares whether it sells or not. If you put so much expectations and pressure,you won’t make it and no fun anymore
    Self destruction

  3. I find wholesale transactions to be 5-10% of godaddy estimated value. But I only sell them in blocks of 500 + domains at that price. You have to have a good portfolio with a strong track record. You also have to have a buyer who knows the industry and what they are looking at. It’s good for cash flow but of course the flip side is you lose a lot of domains that would have sold at a much higher price in the future.

  4. Being a domain investor is a lot harder than it is being a domain broker.
    Just like there are bad domain investors, there are also bad domain brokers. Not that Jen is one of them. But cut us domain investors some slack. Anyone can be a domain broker. Just like anyone can be a real estate agent. But owning the land online or offline is harder to do than it is to offer to sell someone else’s property for them.

  5. “No Hate” here Jen Sale, however there’s a lot of hate emanating from the domain industry. I’m sure you know who I am for I think we’ve crossed paths. Recently I’ve been “binging” on .LINK domains, and just today I purchased 50+ two word domains like KeepSurfing.link for just $2 each. KeepSurfing.com is for sale @GD for 13K, and who would have thunk it’s not even trademarked:) Jen, the East Coast Surfing championship is held here in Virginia Beach, and one would think “KeepSurfing(.)anything” might appeal to surfers around the world. Like you, i believe there’s a better way of selling domains, and it’s NOT buying, holding, praying and waiting on a buyer. Note to Jen, “.(.)LINK is no worse than (.)COM”:)

  6. “Note to Jen, “.(.)LINK is no worse than (.)COM”:)”

    The market will make that determination on its own.

  7. “Do a Google search for terms related to a particular domain name…”
    Bing might work better as they seem to give more weight to the domain than Google, and you might get better results without spaces and using quotation marks (i.e. “phoenixrealestate”).

  8. I think the point of the original thread was essentially “quit spamming twitter to sell to domainers” Go do something more productive if you want to sell your domains wholesale. . . here’s the tips. . . .
    Many seem to be missing the point.

    Also owning a domain isn’t hard . . . finding them nowadays is hard. A good broker puts in work. Domain ownership requires paying renewal fees and literally no work. It’s the best non-job I’ve ever had

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